www.livingworldphotography.net > Spiders

Agelena sp (Funnel-Web Spider)

Agelena sp (Funnel-Web Spider)

Not too much to say about these relatively common spiders other than to note the funnel-shaped webs they spin, hence the name "Funnel-Web".


Aphonopelma sp.

Aphonopelma sp.

This monster of a Mygalomorph was found crossing a dirt road in Bay Area in California.


Aranea gemma (Cat-faced Spider)

Aranea gemma (Cat-faced Spider)

This robust Orb-Weaver is from the genus Aranea.


Argiope aurantia - Black-and-yellow Argiope

Argiope aurantia - Black-and-yellow Argiope

Nice shot of A. argiope on Swamp Milkweed


Argiope trifasciata - Banded Argiope

Argiope trifasciata - Banded Argiope

Eating Tibicen aurantia


Calisoga sp

Calisoga sp

Family Nemesiidae. This had been wrongly ID'd for a long time


Centruroides hentzi - Hentz's Bark Scorpion

Centruroides hentzi - Hentz's Bark Scorpion

I believe this species of bark scorpion is endemic to Florida. The can be found, not surprisingly, under bark.


Centruroides vittatus - Striped Bark Scorpion

Centruroides vittatus - Striped Bark Scorpion

My first photo of a scorpion. This TINY scorpion, no more than a centimeter or two long was found under a rock. It was rather chilly and he was not inclined to budge or try and sting me


Cyclosa turbinata (Trashline Spider)

Cyclosa turbinata (Trashline Spider)

This very small spider collects bits of dirt and debris on its web and then conceals itself among them so it can ambush its prey.


Geolycosa sp - Wolf Spider

Geolycosa sp - Wolf Spider

This is a fairly large wolf spider in the family Lycosidae, it blends perfectly with the sand


Habronattus americanus

Habronattus americanus

This pretty little jumping spider caught my eye while it walked along a pine tree. The bright red setae on the legs and chelicerae were incredibly pretty.


Habronattus decorus (Jumping Spider)

Habronattus decorus (Jumping Spider)

My first decent picture of a Salticid. If you do it correctly, pictures of these tiny spiders can be absolutely amazing.


Habronattus decorus - Jumping Spider

Habronattus decorus - Jumping Spider

This shot shows the large pedipalps really well, which indicates this is a male


Habronattus decorus - Jumping Spider

Habronattus decorus - Jumping Spider

Another photo series of this beautiful jumping spider


Hogna sp (Wolf Spider)

Hogna sp (Wolf Spider)

This Wolf Spider is eating a Cabbage White Butterfly.


Latrodectus bishopi - Red Widow

Latrodectus bishopi - Red Widow

This is the female of the species. The typical widow color pattern is reversed on this species. This spider makes large webs at the tops of palmettos. It's endemic to central Florida.


Latrodectus mactans (Black Widow)

Latrodectus mactans (Black Widow)

One of my earliest attempts at macro-photography, this female Black Widow was found in an abandoned outhouse in western Missouri.


Latrodectus variolus - Northern Black Widow

Latrodectus variolus - Northern Black Widow

I turned over a log and what to my wondering eyes did a appear but a poisonous spider but I had little to fear. This is a female black widow spider, and it is in fact poisonous - but aside from hurting and giving you mild flu-like symptoms for a day, it does no lasting harm and won't be a danger unless your very young or very old. That being said, these spiders don't bite unless seriously provoked andyou're not likely to find them anywhere that should casuse you problems. These prefer under boards and rocks, old shed, things like that. Be nice to them, there is no reason to kill these spiders.


Loxosceles reclusa - Brown Recluse

Loxosceles reclusa - Brown Recluse

I did NOT know what this was when I was taking pictures of it from about 5 inches away. It was only later when going through spider families that I came upon the family Sicariidae, or Six-eyed Spiders, and that's when my stomach kind of flipped over. I'd heard of that family before, and the only thing I could ever remember hearing in relationship to it is that it's the family to which the Brown Recluse belongs. *shiver* I caught this guy and am saving him for my spider bio class this fall.


Maevia inclemens - Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Maevia inclemens - Dimorphic Jumping Spider

Caught this little jumper by sweep-netting on campus. Quite cute!


Misumenoides formosipes - White-banded Crab Spider

Misumenoides formosipes - White-banded Crab Spider

Hiding in thistle, completely ignoring all other insects


Misumenops celer (Crab Spider)

Misumenops celer (Crab Spider)

This colorful crab spider is called Misumenops celer, and in this photo it is devouring a small fly (maybe a Stratomyid)


Misumenops sp - Crab Spider

Misumenops sp - Crab Spider

Another Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae


Nephila clavipes - Golden Silk Spider

Nephila clavipes - Golden Silk Spider

This spider grows to be absolutely huge, over 4 or 5 inches with leg span included, and builds huge webs. It is strongly sexually dimorphic, and the female (shown here) is much much larger than the male. This is a ventral view. The dorsal habitus is bright golden yellow.


Peucetia viridans - Green Lynx Spider

Peucetia viridans - Green Lynx Spider

These huge lynx spiders were very common on the prickly pear cactus. The were easily 2.5" long (legs included).


Phidippus clarus - Jumping Spider

Phidippus clarus - Jumping Spider

Another little Jumper in the Phidippus complex.


Phidippus princeps - Jumping Spider

Phidippus princeps - Jumping Spider

Another jumping spider (I'm very fond of them) Caught while sweep netting around campus


Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider)

Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider)

This large spider is in the Nursery-Web Spider's family Pisauridae. Found this one under a board, and it scared me half to death


Platycryptus undatus - Jumping Spider

Platycryptus undatus - Jumping Spider

This Jumper is actually a pretty good size, I was surprised


Rabidosa rabida

Rabidosa rabida

You can see the egg sac that is being carried around by the female spider (its the white thing)


Solifugid

Solifugid

This Solifugid is in the family Eremobatidae. He's munching down on an ant. Despite what you may have heard about 'Camel Spiders', these are harmless and have no venom at all.


Thiodina sylvana

Thiodina sylvana

This colorful jumping spider was caught while sweep-netting


Thiodina sylvana female

Thiodina sylvana female

This is the female of the same species, strong sexual dimorphism, though that seems to be pretty common in some groups of spiders


Thiodina sylvana male

Thiodina sylvana male

Best shot yet


Thiodina sylvana male

Thiodina sylvana male

This is another photo of Thiodina sylvana found while sweep-netting


Tibellus sp (Running Crab Spider)

Tibellus sp (Running Crab Spider)

This is a Running Crab Spider from the family Philodromidae. This individual is eating a Crane Fly.